SCRCA Definitions: Condition Codes

The "Condition Code" classification is only used for structures. It indicates the condition of a structure at the time it was last assessed by a member of the SCRCA Project Team. To view or hide a definition, click / tap on the relevant condition code / short description.

Important Notes: The structure assessments conducted as part of the SCRCA Project are quick visual assessments only. They are usually carried-out from a distance and some are carried-out without a site visit (using only photographs and / or video-stills). These structure assessments are NOT detailed structural or archaeological surveys and they must NOT be used or interpreted as such. For standing structures, condition information is NOT normally made available to the general public as, in many cases, it is potentially sensitive information.


Appears (from a quick visual inspection) to be structurally sound, weather-tight and with no significant repairs needed. No follow-up action required but, for key structures (only), a revisit should be scheduled if resources permit.

Appears (from a quick visual inspection) to be structurally sound, but in need of minor repairs or showing signs of a general lack of maintenance. No follow-up action required in the short-term but, for key structures, it may be advisable to arrange a revisit if resources permit.

There is clear visual evidence of deteriorating building materials (masonry, concrete, wood, metal, etc) and / or a leaking roof and / or defective water goods and / or there has been a fire or other disaster which has clearly affected part of the building. Consider options for follow-up action in the medium term. For key structures (and if resources permit), arrange a follow-up revisit.

There has been structural failure or there are clearly visible signs of structural instability; and / or building materials are in a state of dilapidation / rot; and / or there has been serious loss of significant areas of roof-covering leading to major deterioration of the interior; and / or there has been a major fire or other disaster affecting most of the building. Consider options for both short- and longer-term follow-up action. For key structures (and if resources permit), arrange a follow-up revisit.

The structure has either collapsed or been wholly or substantially demolished, although its location can be identified by remaining earthworks and / or rubble and / or foundations. No follow-up action or further visits will be required once the remains have been recorded and photographed.

The structure has been demolished or removed completely - there is no trace of the building / structure above ground-level and no visible earthworks or foundations can be discerned that might indicate its location. No follow-up action or further visits will be required once the site has photographed.

The structure could not be assessed at the time of the visit as it (or its site) could not be seen (or could not be seen clearly enough) from the nearest publicly accessible location.

This structure has not yet been assessed and its condition is not known.