Reference sources - 4: Conservation & Archaeology

Online resources

  • A 2016 Historic England publication entitled "Conservation Area Designation, Appraisal and Management" (26-pages, 306kb) is available from:
    https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/conservation-area-designation-appraisal-management-advice-note-1/
  • A 2016 Historic-England publication entitled "Understanding Historic Buildings: A guide to good recording practice" (op. cit.).
  • A 2018 Historic-England publication entitled “Transport Sites: Scheduling Selection Guide” (28-pages, 1.15Mb pdf file) available for download in pdf format from:
    https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/dssg-transport-sites/
  • A 2016 Historic-England publication entitled "Historic England Advice Note 7: Local Heritage Listing" (20-pages, 587Kb pdf file) is available from:
    https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/local-heritage-listing-advice-note-7/
  • A 2013 English Heritage[HE] publication entitled “Midland Main Line Statement of History and Significance”) provides an interesting contrast to the work being carried-out for the Settle-Carlisle Line as part of the SCRCA Project. The consultation period for the Midland Mainline project has expired and, unfortunately, it seems that this document is no longer available as a pdf download.
  • Historic England maintains an online architectural thesaurus (referred to as the "Components Thesaurus") which may be helpful when trying to describe architectural features or understand such descriptions (e.g. when reviewing Listed Building entries). This can be accessed at:
    http://thesaurus.historicengland.org.uk/thes_menu.asp?thes_no=546
  • In 2011, Network Rail publicly announced their intention to transfer all UK railway signalling operations to 14 'rail signalling centres' over a thirty-year period. This consolidation programme will see the closure of all remaining mechanical signalboxes. As part of the National Heritage Protection Plan (NHPP), and working in partnership with Network Rail and the National Railway Museum, English Heritage[HE] launched a project to assesses the significance of England’s remaining signal boxes. A report containing the results of this review was published in April 2012 and details are as follows: Minnis, John "Railway Signal Boxes: A Review", published in 2012 by English Heritage[HE] as part of their Research Report Series (reference no 28-2012). A pdf version of this report can be downloaded from:
    http://research.historicengland.org.uk/Report.aspx?i=15102&ru=%2fResults.aspx%3fp%3d1%26n%3d10%26rn%3d28%26ry%3d2012%26ns%3d1
  • There is a page on Network Rail's website entitled "Britain's signalling heritage" which contains an Excel spreadsheet that lists all of the remaining signalboxes on the NR network as well as those on the various preserved railways etc. The URL for the webpages is:
        http://www.networkrail.co.uk/community/interest-groups/signalling-heritage/
  • A Department for Culture, Media and Sport publication "Principles of Selection for Listing Buildings", (March 2010) can be downloaded (in the form of a 65kb pdf file) from: http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/historic_environment/3330.aspx
  • An unpublished fieldwork report produced in 2008 by Ed Dennison Archaeological Services Ltd for the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority entitled "Garsdale Station and Moorcock Cottages, Garsdale Head, Garsdale, Cumbria and North Yorkshire: Pennine Bridleway Phase 1 Archaeological Survey" can be downloaded from http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/greylit/details.cfm?id=7586
  • Following the 'Time Team' visit to the site of the Settle-Carlisle Railway construction camp / works above Rise Hill Tunnel, Wessex Archaeology produced a formal archaeological report "Risehill Tunnel Navvy Camp, Cumbria: Archaeological Evaluation and Assessment of Results" (2008). A 2.55Mb pdf version is available for download from: http://www.wessexarch.co.uk/reports/68737/risehill-tunnel-navvy-camp.

Footnotes

[HE] In 2015, the section of English Heritage responsible for listing,scheduling, etc. became a separate organisation under the name 'Historic England' - see https://historicengland.org.uk/.

Series Links

The list of potentially useful / interesting reference sources is now far too long for a single page, so it has been split into five separate pages - one for each of the following sections:

  1. Building the line
  2. Operating the line
  3. Historic Structures
  4. Conservation & Archaeology
  5. General Reference

 The links above will enable you to jump directly to the relevant section.

Acknowledgments

This list of reference sources was compiled by Mark R. Harvey. (© Mark R. Harvey, all rights reserved.)