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September 2017

SCRCA Note: PDF version of annotated image for Littledale Limestone Quarry

Created on 9 Sep 2017.

A larger version of Bill Fraser's annotated image is available in pdf format via the following link: 248900_2017_WFr_AR_Little-Dale-Quarry_v5 .pdf The text beneath the image reads: In Little Dale the Hardraw Scar Limestone was quarried to provide stone for the viaduct. Here it is around 7 metres thick and made up of individual beds of limestone approximately 40-50 cm thick, separated by thinner layers of mudstone. The thickness of the beds was ideal for the size of stones required in the… Read more

SCRCA Note: PDF version of annotated image for Force Gill Limestone Quarry

Created on 9 Sep 2017.

A larger version of Bill Fraser's annotated image is available in pdf format via the following link: 249290_2017_WFr_AR_Force-Gill-Quarries_v5 .pdf The text beneath the image reads: At Force Gill the Simonstone Limestone was quarried to provide stone for the viaduct. This is a hard, dark blue-grey limestone approximately 4 metres thick made up of a number of individual beds, up to 1 metre thick, separated by thin layers of mudstone. In the highest workings nearly half of the limestone lies… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for Dent Head Viaduct (Bridge SAC/77)

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extract is from page 501: Alighting from our engine, we stroll forward to look at the next viaduct: it is in the magnificent Dent Valley, the town of Dent being, however, some eight miles to our left. This viaduct is 200 yards long, of ten semicircular arches, rising 100 feet above the public road, and also over a little… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for Ribblehead Viaduct (Bridge SAC/66)

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extract is from pages 497-498: Meanwhile the task of erecting the viaduct at Batty Moss was laboriously carried on. It stands on the watershed of the Ribble and on Little Dale Beck, and is the largest work on the line, consisting of 24 arches, the height of the loftiest from the bottom of the foundation to the level of… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for Blea Moor Tunnel

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extract is from pages 494-497, 498 and 501: The first work at the tunnel itself was the sinking of the shafts. This was done by the aid of a “jack roll," which is like the windlass over a common well, until horse gins could be got into position; and these in their turn were superseded by four winding engines, placed at… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for Rise Hill Tunnel

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extract is from pages 506-508: A short distance from the northern end of Cow Gill is Black Moss or Rise Hill Tunnel, one of the largest works on the line. Let us visit it as it appeared when in course of construction. We toil up the steep side of the Cow Gill ravine, and come to a small opening in the side of the hill… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of Lancaster Guardian (22/6/1872) for Rise Hill Tunnel

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

The following contemporary account appeared in the June 22nd, 1872 edition of the Lancaster Guardian. It recounts a visit by the writer to Black Moss / Rise Hill Tunnel. Being curious to see what was going on in the tunnel, I descended with two of the men number one shaft. The gloom in the rocky excavation, the hammering of drills, the voices of the men and the dim lights of candles gave to the murky scene a novelty that will long be remembered. The tunnel needs no lining with bricks on account… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for the Ribblehead - Blea Moor Tramway

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Winch or 'Crab' mechanism for winding chains. A wash drawing by John Cooke Bourne. Science Museum Group Collection Online - Ref: 1990-7255. This image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence.The following is a direct quote from pages 493 to 495 of "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876): . . . the work of construction commenced by the… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for the Ribblehead Railway Construction Camp

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extracts are from pages 489-493: Four miles from Selside we cross the turnpike that runs from Ingleton to Hawes; and now the heaviest part of the works begins. The changes here made by the construction of the railway have been stupendous. A few years since, not a vestige of a habitation could be seen. The grouse, and… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for Helwith Bridge (SAC/33)

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extract is from pages 486: "Here a county road has for many years been carried over the Ribble by a little bridge; but the county authorities refused the railway company permission to make a level crossing, so the public road had to be diverted and conducted over the river and the railway by a viaduct of considerable… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for Sheriff Brow Viaduct

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extract is from pages 486: "A mile beyond Stainforth we for the first time pass over the wide rocky bed of the Ribble by a three-arched bridge. Here the engineers had great difficulty in selecting the best route to be taken; the alternatives being, whether to cross and re-cross the river, or by two very heavy cuttings,… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for Langcliffe Lime Works

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extract is from pages 484-5: "We now pass the works of the Craven Lime Company, which, by favour of the Midland authorities, had for some time past been sending off large quantities of lime and limestone by the then unopened railway. The great kiln is formed by one continuous chamber, built in an oval, and communicating… Read more

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of F.S. Williams (1876) for Settle Station

Created on 5 Sep 2017.

Source: "The Midland railway: its rise and progress. A narrative of modern enterprise" by Frederick Smeeton Williams, published by Strahan & Co London (1876). The following extract is from pages 482-3: "Settle presented, when we first saw it, a strange and confused appearance. The pretty passenger station, built of freestone and in Gothic style, was nearly finished; the walls of the spacious goods shed were almost ready to receive the roof, and the commodious cottages hard by for the… Read more

August 2017

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of contemporary accounts for the Ribblehead Railway Construction Camp

Created on 20 Aug 2017.

For accurate statistics relating the size of the temporary navvy settlements in the Ribblehead / Blea Moor area in 1871, see: Extracts from the 1871 census for the "New Parish of Ingleton Fells". For a fascinating description of the Ribblehead Railway Construction Camp, see Contemporary Account of SCR Construction: Lancaster Guardian - 1870, July 23rd.

SCRCA Note: Sources of additional information relating to the Ribblehead Railway Construction Camp

Created on 20 Aug 2017.

For links and references to a wealth of fascinating and useful information about life at - and the sites and structures associated with - the Ribblehead Railway Construction Camp, see "Contemporary accounts relating to the construction of the Settle-Carlisle Railway".

SCRCA Note: Sources of information relating to Ruswarp statue at Garsdale

Created on 17 Aug 2017.

For background information regarding this memorial, please refer to the associated history post at: https://www.foscl.org.uk/content/history/statue-ruswarp-memory-graham-nuttall

July 2017

SCRCA Note: Frontage Refurbished in July 2017

Created on 23 Jul 2017.

The timber frontage was replaced in July 2017. For further information see the News Item entitled 'New frontage for Ribblehead waiting shelter'.

June 2017

SCRCA Primary Reference: Review of the 'Britain from Above' website for Helwith Bridge Quarries

Created on 11 Jun 2017.

The 'Britain from Above' website includes a number of black and white aerial photographs (taken between 1936 and 1949) that show Arcow Quarry and / or Foredale Quarry (along with parts of the surrounding area, including some of the adjacent quarries). Unfortunately, the website's licensing terms preclude the inclusion of these images here, but they can be viewed on the 'Britain from Above' website via the following links: https://britainfromabove.org.uk/en/search?keywords=Arcow%20Quarry&… Read more

SCRCA Note: Current use of 'Ribblehead Quarry Siding' and adjacent quarry site

Created on 10 Jun 2017.

For details of the current use of this site, see 'Ribblehead Railhead and Transfer Sidings'.  

April 2017

SCRCA Secondary Reference: Aerial photographs on the "Britain from above" website

Created on 27 Apr 2017.

The 'http://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/' website provides free online access to a small but fascinating selection of low-resolution aerial photographs covering parts of Britain. Some of these images cover parts of the Settle-Carlisle Railway Conservation Area. Unfortunately, the terms of use prevent these images being reproduced here without payment of a license fee (which we cannot afford). However, the images can be viewed directly on the Britain From Above website by using the search… Read more

SCRCA Secondary Reference: Review of YDNPA Conservation Area Appraisal 2010 for 238400

Created on 26 Apr 2017.

Pages 20-23 of "Conservation Area Appraisals in the Yorkshire Dales National Park - Settle-Carlisle Railway - Adopted Document" (published by the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority in 2010) includes a brief review and history of this site, which is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. A copy of this document can be downloaded in pdf format using the link provided on the Reference sources page.

SCRCA Note: Consolidated record for a group of Midland Railway Company boundary markers

Created on 24 Apr 2017.

There are a number of surviving 'MR' boundary marker posts within the SCRCA. They are all identical in design. To keep the database to a manageable size, a single SCRCA Structure Record has been created to cover all of the markers in the area concerned. The coordinates are approximate and relate to either the first boundary marker identified in the area or the middle marker in a distinct row.

SCRCA Note regarding accessibility / visibility of the former Blue Rock Quarry Spur / Siding

Created on 21 Apr 2017.

The former spur / siding for Blue Rock Quarry is private property. Part of the former trackbed now lies within the garden of Hazel Cottage.

SCRCA Note: Text of sign at north portal to Birkett Common Tunnel

Created on 13 Apr 2017.

The text of the sign at the north portal to Birkett Tunnel reads: "168 BIRKETT TUNNEL  424 YARDS"